edwardhenry

November 14, 2006

Ben Franklin was Wrong

Filed under: culture, religion — ted @ 10:24 pm

A firecracker of an article in Skeptic magazine puts forth the possibility that religion, far from being a positive factor in the health of a society, may actually be detrimental. This is, of course, contrary to popular wisdom — especially here in America, as expressed by Benjamin Franklin: “religion will be a powerful regulator of our actions, give us peace and tranquility within our minds, and render us benevolent, useful and beneficial to others.”

The piece summarizes a recent study in the Journal of Religion & Society, which revealed the following:

“The most theistic prosperous democracy, the U.S., is exceptional, but not in the manner Franklin predicted. The United States is almost always the most dysfunctional of the developed democracies, sometimes spectacularly so, and almost always scores poorly.” This deviates immensely from what most Americans consider to be common wisdom: that religion is beneficial. “But in the other developed democracies religiosity continues to decline precipitously and avowed atheists often win high office, even as clergies warn about adverse societal consequences if a revival of creator belief does not occur.”

Proving that religion does not have an overall positive effect on societal health is not likely to convince a believer that religion is a detriment, since it is a matter of personal belief and meaning (etc) not a social program. The data are impressive, but drawing a conclusion is not really possible:

The question is one of causation, and there is no clear answer. Whether religion leads directly to dysfunctionality, or religions merely flourish in dysfunctional societies, neither conclusion from this study flatters religion. The first tells us that religion is a hindrance to the development of moral character, and the second that religion hinders progress by distracting us from our troubles (with imaginary solutions to real problems). This study is complicated enough that I do not think that we can draw definitive negative conclusions about religion. But we can at least conclude, contrary to popular belief in this country, that it is not a given that religious societies are better, healthier, or more moral. What we can be clear about from this study is that highly religious societies can be dysfunctional, whereas by comparison secular societies in which evolution is largely accepted display real social cohesion and societal well-being. As is always the case in science, more data and additional research will help clarify our conclusions.

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